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Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of Food habits and nutrition of mule deer on Nevada ranges found in the catalog.

Food habits and nutrition of mule deer on Nevada ranges

Paul T. Tueller

Food habits and nutrition of mule deer on Nevada ranges

by Paul T. Tueller

  • 46 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Agricultural Experiment Station, Max C. Fleischmann College of Agriculture, University of Nevada in Reno .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Nevada
    • Subjects:
    • Mule deer -- Nevada -- Food.,
    • Mule deer -- Nevada -- Nutrition.,
    • Mammals -- Food.,
    • Mammals -- Nevada -- Food.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementPaul T. Tueller.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQL737.U55 T83
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvi, 104 p. :
      Number of Pages104
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4071518M
      LC Control Number79625750

      Mule deer faecal pellets were collected in the Cariboo Region from seven winter ranges that are typical of the Central Interior of BC. Uneven-aged Douglas-fir is the climax forest type on each range. The drier ranges include lodgepole and ponderosa pines in the overstory with pinegrass and bluebunch wheatgrass on the forest floor. The DeLorme Nevada Atlas and Gazetteer is available at most book or sporting goods stores, or by calling them direct at FACILITIES AND SERVICES: Hospitals are located in Cedarville and Susanville, California and Reno. Gas, food, vehicle repair facilities, and motels are located in Cedarville and Gerlach.

      Mule deer are the largest of the five types of deer (mule, whitetail, Columbia blacktail, Sitka blacktail, and Couses') in North America. An extremely large buck can stand 42 inches at the shoulder, measure 7 feet long and weigh up to pounds, with the average . essary for existence including food (Litvaitis et al. ). We Hill ). King Valley, on the northwest edge of desert mule deer range, is one of the hottest and driest regions inhabited by mule deer. The average annual precipitation is cm (Sellers We estimated diets of desert mule deer in each study area by.

      Winter Food Habits of Mule Deer in the Central Interior of British Columbia, by M.J. Waterhouse, H.M. Armleder and R.J. Dawson. BC MOF Res. Note # CONTACTS For more information, please contact any of the authors: Michaela Waterhouse (), Harold Armleder (), or Rick Dawson (). WINTER RANGE DISTRICT SUBZONE. Forbs and grasses are the most important mule deer forages during the growing season in most regions, whereas browse is often most important during the dormant season [ 41, 42, 88, , , , , , ]. In the coastal forests of southern Vancouver Island, mule deer annual diets consisted of 67% browse.


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Food habits and nutrition of mule deer on Nevada ranges by Paul T. Tueller Download PDF EPUB FB2

Food habits and nutrition of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus Rafinesque) on four Nevada ranges / - Biodiversity Heritage Library The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

BHL works best with JavaScript enabledAuthor: Larry Arthur. Doughty, Nevada. Food habits and nutrition of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus Rafinesque) on four Nevada ranges / Title Variants: Alternative: Nevada Cooperative Wildlife Research By. Doughty, Larry Arthur.

United States. Bureau of Land Management. Nevada. Department of Fish and Game. Max C. Fleischmann College of Agriculture.

Food habits and nutrition of mule deer on Nevada ranges [Paul T. Tueller] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Paul T. Tueller. Food habits and nutrition of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus Rafinesque) on four Nevada ranges by Max C. Fleischmann College of Agriculture. Agricultural Experiment Station.

Food habits and nutrition of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus Rafinesque) on four Nevada ranges / By Larry Arthur. Doughty, Max C. Fleischmann College of Agriculture. Agricultural Experiment Station., Nevada. Department of Fish and Game. and United States.

Bureau of Author: Larry Arthur. Doughty, Nevada. Food habits and nutrition of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus Rafinesque) on four Nevada ranges / By Larry Arthur. Doughty, Max C. Fleischmann College of Agriculture. Agricultural Experiment Station., Nevada. Department of Fish and Game.

and United States. Bureau of. Food Habits: Mule Deer are herbivores and are considered browsers. They are nocturnal feeders and are most often seen in the early morning and late evening.

What they eat depends on their habitat, however common food includes forbes or weeds and woody browse like sagebrush and bitterbrush. Colorado Julius G. Nagy Associate Professor Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology Colorado State University Port Collins, Colorado Abstract Deer nutrition and range plant utilization are probably both directly and indirectly associated with the possible mule deer decline.

Mule deer are browsers, eating a wide variety of vegetable matter, such as fresh green leaves, lower branches of trees, twigs and various grasses. They particularly like blackberry and raspberry vines, mistletoe, grapes, mushrooms and ferns. They are able to eat so carefully that they can even eat the fruit of cacti.

Rumen samples from 25 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) were analysed from July to May91 feeding sites frequented by deer were examined and instances of use of plant material were recorded. Vegetative types were spruce, lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine and prairie.

Results varied according to area, altitude, season and weather. Mule deer eat on average 22 grams of dry plant matter per kilogram of body mass. This means a 68 kilogram deer would consume kilograms ( pounds) per day.

Due to the inevitability of shortages in food resources during winter; their metabolism slows to compensate for the lack of calorie intake. Mule deer range from 3 to /2 feet tall at the shoulder, /2 to 7 feet long and have a tail that is 5 to 8 inches long. They can weigh between pounds. The female deer are smaller than the male.

Buy Food habits and nutrition of mule deer on Nevada ranges by Paul T Tueller (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Paul T Tueller. As the food sources dry up, mule deer are easier to find due to the lack of green vegetation holding them in specific areas.

I usually start scouting at the end of June when all the hills are green. The down side to this is the deer are harder to find this time of year due to the palatable food being so abundant. From November to November a study was made in Montana of the food habits of mule deer and elk on a range of grassland and forest.

Weather conditions were normal except for an unusually dry autumn inwhich limited growth of grass and forbs. Intake of grass by deer was highest in the spring but was also unexpectedly high in November and December, when shrub consumption was by: Nevada's Mule Deer Mule deer are the primary big game species in Nevada.

Mule deer are the most numerous,most wide-spread (appendix 1),and most recognizable of Nevada’s wild ungulates. Mule deer populations in Nevada have fluctuated greatly over the past years.

After reaching what was arguably an all-time population high in the lateFile Size: KB. Many good mule deer food studies have been done in Texas and the southwest over the past 60 years. These studies confirm that mule deer feed primarily on woody plants including browse (leaves and twigs) and mast (fruit, beans and berries).

Late summer changes in mule deer diets with increasing use on bitterbrush rangeland D. Austin Utah State University P.

Urness Utah State University J. King Logan, Utah Follow this and additional works at:   5. Miles to go before they sleep – Mule deer are travelers. They’ll easily hike four or five miles from bed to food and back again.

Scan the landscape for at least two hours before dark and after dawn. Hit no man’s land – If you find a spot that looks like the middle of nowhere, it’s probably the middle of mule deer paradise. They. Wildlife Habitat Management Institute Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus) May Fish and Wildlife Habitat Management Leaflet Number 28 General information The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is a member of the family Cervidae, which is characterized by hoofed mammals that shed their antlers annually.

The mule. Food habits and nutrition of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus Rafinesque) on four Nevada ranges. CALL # SFD Brussard, Peter F. Distribution and occurrence of small mammals in the middle altitudes of the Carson Range, : Amy Shannon.FOOD HABITS: Mule deer are herbivores and are considered browsers.

They are nocturnal feeders and are most often seen in the early morning and late evening. What they eat depends on their habitat, however common food includes forbes or weeds and woody browse like sagebrush and bitterbrush.A study was made over a year period in Utah and eastern Nevada of cougar (Felis concolor) stomachs, of which contained food, and intestinal samples and droppings collected mainly in winter.

Additional information was obtained from winter trailing studies. Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) was the most important food in both winter and summer, 65 to 75 per by: